All posts by shellie

Free Class: Leatherworking with Common Household Objects

In this free one hour make & take, you’ll explore ways to add texture and shape to vegetable tanned leather using common household objects! The class will be Thursday, November 9, 2017 upstairs in the Arts & Crafts Area at 7:00 – 8:00 PM.

The instructor, Tamara Clammer, is a Seattle based leatherworker and the Maker Advocate at Brown Paper Tickets.

If you can’t attend this class, you can also join her at Maker Fest at the Niles-Maine District Library from 12:00 – 3:30 pm on November 11th.

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Block Rockin’ Knits

The arts and crafts area has a sewing table with a pinable canvas surface for pattern design, and this is also great for blocking hand knitted items. 

Blocking means stretching the knitted item and steaming it to get a better shape. Acrylic, wool, alpaca and pretty much any fiber used to make a knitted item tends to roll at the edges and be floppy until it is blocked. Factory knitwear is blocked as well as hand knits.

I discovered a new tool called blocking wires which I used on this large lace shawl I recently completed. The wires can be run through the edges and pinned. Using the wires allowed for needing less pins and getting tension faster for the rectangular shape. I steamed the whole piece with a sewing iron and could see it adjust, tightening and relaxing, along the pattern.

Many people wash an item and block it into shape to dry, then steam it. A hat can be blocked on a large party balloon or a Styrofoam head form like the kind sold in beauty supply shops. Steam alone does a good job of getting a crisp shape for your knitted item. Just be careful to hover a steam iron a few inches above the item to not scorch or melt the fibers.

 

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Free Workshop: Earring Exposition

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When: Saturday, October 1, 2016, 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Where: Arts Area (upstairs) Pumping Station: One 3519 N Elston Chicago, IL 60618

Drop in and make a pair of earrings for yourself or as a gift for someone! This is a very basic form of jewelry assembly, no prior experience is required. Learning this skill may help you financially as the “winter holiday gift season” of various faiths approaches.

Beads and findings will be supplied in nickel-free gold and silver costume metal. Bringing a pair of basic round nose pliers will be helpful if you have your own. Expect total time commitment to be in the range of 10 to 20 minutes. Please limit one project per member so the maximum number of people can participate.

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How to Wear a Cabochon with an Irregular Shape

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Now that members have made a bunch of fused glass cabochons this week, what can we do with them? You can make several cabochons and mount them on your own Medieval style gemstone covered book, hot glue it onto your stapler at work and really establish that one is yours, make some really shiny refrigerator magnets but jewelry is the most common application.

I encased my cabochon in a mount by free form hand weaving seed beads. This piece used different stitches and a strong nylon mono-filament thread. The beads are 11/0 size Czech glass and 15/0 size Japanese Miyuki glass. I encased the whole cabochon because the back of the fused glass was rough and uneven.

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Other methods to make jewelry with a cabochon with an irregular shape are:

  • You can stitch bead embroidery around the cabochon securing it onto a backing of leather or heavy fabric. This will be similar to my example but simpler in its execution.
  • Glue on a bar pin back to wear it as a pin.
  • Glue on a bail to wear it on a chain or cord. There are many colors, sizes and shapes of ready made jewelry bails.
  • Wire wrap the cabochon with jewelry wire.

Given the resources we have at the space, someone could even 3D print a setting for their piece and then cast it in metal!

 

 

 

 

 

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The Joy of Melting Glass in a Microwave Oven

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Samuel and Sylvia Sion brought in to last night’s member meeting an amazing impromptu class on fused glass. Glass usually has melting points higher than metal, yet there are these new miniature kilns that work inside of a conventional microwave oven! This makes fused glass work far more accessible and affordable from past days of using a larger plug-in electric kiln for hours. The time to melt an art glass cabochon was usually under five minutes with about 45 minutes needed for cooling. The larger kiln fit several pieces at once.

The microwave being used for glass fusing needs to be dedicated to art use only and never used for food again. (Cadmium and other pigments used for colorants are toxic, so this is a needed safety precaution.) Care needs to be taken to not overheat the microwave and destroy it, so letting the door stand open and the unit cool off between rounds of fusing glass is needed. Also, microwave kiln shelf paper needs to be placed on the base of the kiln to keep glass from melting onto the surface the kiln and destroying it. Heavy weight welding gloves worked as oven mitts to transfer hot kilns and the kilns rested safely on our ceramic fire bricks to cool.

Glass specifically made for fusing needs to be used for projects, like the brightly colored Dichroic glass example I made below. Dichroic and fusing glasses are the shiny, beautiful art glass pieces you always see in jewelry at art fairs. The price for making them yourself is very reasonable with this new method; you can buy enough to make several pieces for $20-$30. The kilns and tools to get started are being added to the small metals area and will be available within the following weeks.

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Creative Celebrations at the 7th Birthday Party!

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People trickled in through the evening and participated in events for our 7th Birthday Party last weekend! Grilled meats, snacks and vegan pizza were served up to the mingling masses. Lockpicking with TOOOL.us went down, a group mural went up, games were played, dyes went into fabric and a familiar face returned to our space…

Continue reading Creative Celebrations at the 7th Birthday Party!

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Event: Confectionery Combat! Chocolate VS Shelly and Gerald

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What:
Confectionery Combat! Chocolate VS Shelly and Gerald:

When:
Friday February 12, 6:30-8:30 pm

 

We will start with a discussion on the evil ways of this culinary foe and tactics to successfully wage war against it.

We will be making truffles, roasting nuts, coating lots of things with chocolate, and “practicing” our feeble double boiler tempering skills.  Practice is the word! Just as in war there is no guarantee of success but at least in this we will have chocolate.

This event is open to PS:One members and their guests who want to watch, sample, and participate as the space allows. (There will probably be a cap at 10 people in that small kitchen) If you know you are coming give us a holler on the member group here so we can prepare excess supplies and plan our battle strategy.  The cost is free but donations to fund our efforts will encourage more such campaigns.

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Hack a Replacement Wacom Tablet USB Cable

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Did you lose the USB to USB Micro B cable that connects your Wacom pen tablet to your computer? Don’t panic! This is not necessarily another propriety piece of equipment you can only get from the manufacturer. There is a quick fix.

The cable that comes with the Wacom may alarm you to have lost it; it looks unique, since the smaller Micro B end has a 90 degree angle turn. This is a design element possibly for aesthetics and maybe to prevent the cable from pulling out easily from the tablet while it is in use. You do not need a replacement cable exactly like the one that shipped from the manufacturer. What you need is a replacement cable that fits.

This is where cable replacement gets tricky because the Micro B port on the tablet is deep and very narrow. Most cheap, off the shelf cables have both ends encased in a massive brick of rubber that will not fit the tiny 6 mm tall by 12 mm wide Wacom Micro B opening. You can take any old cable and make it fit by whittling down the rubber as close as you can to the metal. A box cutter with a sharp, new blade works well. I tried to improve the look of this hacked cable with a single wrap of electrical tape, but had to then remove the tape as that still made the Micro B end too thick to attach.

If you want a neater cable to use for the long term, beyond this DIY quick fix, step away from the cable aisle in your electronics store and head over by the cell phone accessories. The Micro B cables marketed for smartphones tend to have a sleeker design, more color choices and smaller rubber grips which will insert into the Wacom. Bring your pen tablet with to make sure the cable you select will fit before you leave the store. Also, be sure you get a combined data and charging cable, since charging only cables that look similar are usually in the mix of products for cell phones.

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B.Y.O.T. Tie Dye Summer Event, Friday, 7/3/2015

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Bring your own t-shirt, or other white item, and fill it with fabric dye! B.Y.O.T. Tie Dye Summer Event with be Friday, 7/3/2015, from 6:00 – 9:00 pm in the upstairs arts and crafts area, a free event for members. A 100% cotton item works best such as a clean t-shirt, socks, a hat, apron., etc. Washing items is helpful if they are newly purchased but avoid fabric softener, which is oily and repels dye. Twelve bright colors in easy applicator bottles and all other materials will be provided for you to hand color your item.

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