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Math Office Hours, this Sunday from 5 to 7

Express your inner mathnerd! Come join us for an evening of learning: algebra, calculus, word problems, finding x, and much, much more. We’re open to anyone looking to brush up on basic skills and to those who want to learn about more advanced topics. We can even stray into set theory, topology, and fourier analysis…. it’s all up to you!

If you’re feeling intimidated, don’t be. Any level of math experience is welcome. We will be happy to discuss any topic that falls under “math”. No question is too basic. Got a homework question? We can help! Trying to solve a tricky equation for a problem? We’ll think it through with you. Want to learn the basics of what math is all about? We’ve got you covered!

Math should be a common language to all, and we will be more than happy to help you take the first steps towards a lifelong appreciation of this beautiful subject!

Show and Tell

At the start of this week’s Math Office Hours, we’ll be doing show and tell. If you have a math topic you’re interested in, come tell us about it. Presentations can be as short as 2 minutes or as long as 20 minutes.

Whos, Whens, and Wheres

  • Who – Anyone who wants to learn about math
  • Where – PS:One, second floor, in the electronics area
  • When – Sunday, June 9th, 5pm until 7pm
  • How much – Free

10

11 2013

Math Office Hours, this Sunday from 5 to 7

Once again, x has gone missing. Help us find him!

Join us for an evening of math and learning. There’ll be spheres and equations and integrals, (oh my!). We’re open to anyone looking to brush up on basic skills and to those who want to learn a bit about advanced topics. We’ll be talking about set theory, topology, linear algebra, logic, geometry, and anything else that comes up.

All levels of math skill are welcome. Whether there’s something from grade school you never understood, or you’ve always been fascinated by something a bit beyond you, come and ask. Got a homework question? We can help! Working through a tricky problem for a project? We’ll think it through with you. Confused as to how anyone could ever like math? We’ll do our best to convey the elegance and beauty of the subject.

Show and Tell

At the start of this week’s Math Office Hours, we’ll be doing show and tell. If you have a math topic you’re interested in, come tell us about it.

Last week’s talks included:

  • Non-Euclidean Geometry, the discovery that Euclid’s ancient laws of geometry work just as well on a curved surface such as a saddle or a sphere if you reject the parallel postulate.
  • A proof that given two complex numbers, the magnitude of their product is the product of their magnitudes.
  • A Math Olympiad challenge: Given two primes p and q, show that 24 is a divisor of p^2 – q^2.
  • Manifolds, a basic example of charts and change-of-coordinate maps. The configuration space of a double pendulum as an example of a non-physical manifold.

Whos, Whens, and Wheres

  • Who – Anyone who wants to learn about math
  • Where – PS:One, second floor, in the electronics area
  • When – Sunday, June 23th, 5pm until 7pm
  • How much – Free

18

06 2013

Math Office Hours, this Sunday from 5 to 7

Express your inner mathnerd! Come join us for an evening of learning: algebra, calculus, word problems, finding x, and much, much more. We’re open to anyone looking to brush up on basic skills and to those who want to learn about more advanced topics. We can even stray into set theory, topology, and fourier analysis…. it’s all up to you!

If you’re feeling intimidated, don’t be. Any level of math experience is welcome. We will be happy to discuss any topic that falls under “math”. No question is too basic. Got a homework question? We can help! Trying to solve a tricky equation for a problem? We’ll think it through with you. Want to learn the basics of what math is all about? We’ve got you covered!

Math should be a common language to all, and we will be more than happy to help you take the first steps towards a lifelong appreciation of this beautiful subject!

Whos, Whens, and Wheres

  • Who – Anyone who wants to learn about math
  • Where – PS:One, second floor, in the electronics area
  • When – Sunday, May 26th, 5pm until 7pm
  • How much – Free

22

05 2013

I Can Haskell? Sunday 2/24 at 6:00pm

Perl has a mantra that goes, “Easy things are easy and hard things are possible.” In Haskell, the mantra is slightly different:

“Hard things are easy and the impossible just happened!”

If you’ve never seen Haskell before, you’re in for a real treat. It’s a language where functions can’t have side-effects, where variables
don’t vary, and where infinitely long lists are a topic suitable for chapter 2. To learn to program in Haskell is to bend your mind.

At its heart, functional programming is about correctness. Correct programs are ones that do what they’re supposed to do. While most
programming languages today are designed to churn out mostly-working code very quickly, the aim of functional languages is to produce actually-correct code at a reasonable pace. It’s a great tool for writing compilers, concurrent applications, secure systems, and algorithmic-heavy software for science or engineering. It’s also a good way to keep your robots from uprising against mankind.

Especially in the last few years, functional programming has been gaining significant momentum in industry. It is purported to be more modular, better at scaling, easier to parallelize, and leads to fewer bugs. Come see what the hype is all about and decide for yourself.

tl;dr

Who: Programmers interested in learning about functional programming.
What: A class on functional programming using Haskell.
Where: PSOne.
When: Sunday 2/24 at 6pm.
Why: Because lambdas.
How much: The class is free.
What else: Bring your laptop. You might also want to install Haskell Platform.

19

02 2013