Posts Tagged ‘Projects’

Shell Casing Pen

It is impossible to buy presents for my dad. I’ve exhausted my repertoire of gifts. I pride myself on giving fantastic gifts, but the man seems hell-bent on flabbergasting me. So, when I finally figured out this year’s Father’s Day gift, I felt damn proud.

A little context – my dad’s father died almost two years ago, and I’d been hanging onto a shell casing from the 5-gun veteran’s salute since then.

original shell casing

I decided to make a pen out of the casing. See a breakdown of process below. Much credit to Jordan, because you all know I can’t operate any of the shop machinery. Yet.

1. Cut off the casing end from hollow shell body and drill a wider opening. The brass is very soft so use a rubber clamp and a jewelry cutting saw.
2. Cut, hollow out, and finish hard wood shaft for pen body extension. Stain if you so choose. I used a light cherry stain as the wood was almost white.

before assembly

3. Epoxy and insert wood shaft into wide end of shell casing, and epoxy casing end to opposite end of wood shaft as pen cap.

shell casing end pen cap

4. Mold hot glue into removable stopper for pen tip using WD-40 to keep glue from sticking to ink insert and shape into cone using heated blade (neat side effect is that the glue becomes glassy and transparent). Pop in pen tip with glue stopper!

hot glue stopper for pen tip

…and fin!

finished product

I hope he likes it. I’m going to give it to him on Friday. :)

20

06 2011

Making Parts for a Replica Daft Punk Helmet

Nick’s latest project is a replica daft punk helmet. With some help from Dan and his PhlatPrinter Nick was able cut out some parts from his Google SketchUp Design. Dan made a short video of what they did and promoting how collaboration through Pumping Station: One is totally awesome! Great work Nick and Dan!

09

04 2011

Yarn words (and acronyms)

rtfm

Quick crafting project: yarn words (and acronyms). Found this at Craft, but here are the full instructions.

I couldn’t find any wire reinforced clothesline, so experimented with thermostat wire and others: basically, check out the wire section of your local hardware store and test what they’ve got. You’re looking for something bendable, but that will retain its shape, and can definitely be doubled up on itself, hopefully flush, without a little loop at the end. Some wire types I found did this better than others.

Also, you’ll want to use chunky, bulky or worsted weight yarn, or else you’ll be winding for a very long time.

I’ve made three, and they’re pretty quick once you get going, other than having to remember how to do cursive and remembering that i’s and j’s have the problem of not easily being able to do dots with this format.

Weird” was my first, then “rtfm” and “pebkac.” Other geeky words and acronyms may follow.

05

03 2011

Workshop Build Out – Take One

PS:One has recently expanded its space and will be moving the workshop into a separate room to accommodate more tools and electronics.   Today, a bunch of people got together to build some new workbenches and move some tools into the new shop.

Here’s a photo of what we have so far:

The three tables were built today.  Two of them are pretty basic, but what’s that wierd stuff on the bottom of that one?

That’s a cockamamie caster system to make this table roll.  The casters are on a hinged board so the legs can still operate as normal when the board flips up, but when the table is lifted the board will flip itself down and those hinged supports above it brace the casters into position, making it a pretty sturdy rolling table.  Nathan Witt got this idea from another hackerspace.  (If anyone knows which one it was I’ll credit them, thanks for the idea!)

You can also see our new shelves behind the tables.  Jen Savage and Tim Winkler donated them and they’ll definitely see plenty of good use here.  Thanks guys!

26

02 2011

Thing-A-Day Month: Day 1

Thing-A-Day is a month long creative sprint where you have to make something new every day.  Some of us here at Pumping Station: One are going to be participating.  We’ll be logging our efforts here — enjoy!

I started working on a hollow book, and Tim Saylor made some incredibly apropos snow shoes.

02

02 2011

15 minute hacks! Light box

One day after a Pumping Station: One meeting, Patrick and I arbitrarily set ourselves to making a light box.  This is what ensued.

The design was completely ad hoc and the workmanship was sub-sub-standard, but it came together exactly as I pictured it.  The biggest problem was that neither of us really knew how to make a light box.  Most importantly we didn’t have poster board to use for the backing or lights to properly light the item.  We just built the box and covered it with some fabric we found in the space, and we positioned the box to use ambient lighting as well as we could.  If someone were to make one of these in more than 15 minutes, those would be the things to change.  That and actually looking at real instructions from people who know what they’re doing.

Happy hacking!

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20

12 2010

Electron Microscope Project highlighted by MAKE Blog

A quick note: my open source Scanning Tunneling Electron Microscope project has been mentioned in the MAKE blog.

26

07 2010

Interview with Irish Radio

Last night, I had the honor of an interview with Irish Radio show IT Freely.  I discussed hackerspaces in general, Pumping Station: One, and the nanotech and Scanning Tunneling Electron Microscope projects I’m working on (look on my personal website), and the current state of garage tinkering and science.

IT Freely Season 2, Episode 15, direct link.

24

03 2010

Flex Resistor Jacket!

My flex resistor jacket is finally finished. After a month and a half of failures and a whole bunch of setbacks, the PS:One logo is finally embedded with twenty big LEDs which are attach to a circuit board and a flex resistor. The LEDs only light up when the right elbow is bent to a certain extent. It runs off of two AA batteries held along with the circuit board in a pocket on the left shoulder.

The jacket was premiered (sort of) at Digital Breakdown on Dec. 18th to help promote PS:One. Bunches of recently printed stickers didn’t hurt either. Luckily, the jacket is perfect for dancing.

Thanks to Jeff Kantarek and Jordan Bunker for their huge amounts of help on this project. Without their expertise this jacket would not be glowy.

19

12 2009

Want to build a fabric light bright?

Photo 149Go ahead! The link below this post will take you to V1.1 of the PDF How-To to build one yourself, with step-by-step instructions and a pretty exhaustive materials list. Also some pictures, but perhaps not as many as there should be. Regardless! Is the PDF confusing or vague? Any questions? Go ahead and e-mail me at eli.skipp@gmail.com so that I can update the PDF and so that your questions can get answered. Happy hacking!

Fabric Light Bright PDF

[EDIT!]: This project is under a Creative Commons license!

Creative Commons License
Fabric Light-Bright by Eli Skipp is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.

12

12 2009