Bronze Casting!!!!!!

As you may have noticed, the Small Metals area has moved to where hot metals used to live. The process has been gradual but successful. We conducted an experiment over the weekend involving plaster investment and molten bronze. There were many variables in this process including new-to-the-space machinery: the kiln, the electric melting furnace, and the vacuum investment table. As well as different materials used, possibly expired flux, a new kind of plaster, and a type of bronze that had been melted a number of times before. All in all it was a great success. Here is a brief overview along with some photos to enjoy.

Seen here is the kiln at a glowing red temperature of 1,500 degrees. The molten bronze getting ready for the pour. Also seen in this picture is the vacuum table for the cast to help pull the metal through the investment.

The Termolyne mini melt electric melting furnace! Bronze has a melting point of 1,742 degrees 

The pour!

 

Fresh out of the pickle!

Finished rings! All of them (except the black stone in the middle) were cast at PS:One.

-Ella Gentz

16

05 2017

Turning the Shopbot into a plotter

Former PS:1 president Derek Bever and I were joking in the PS:1 IRC chat room awhile back about using the Shopbot as a tool for uses it was not designed for, and turning it into a plotter seemed especially ridiculous. Since I’d wanted to learn how to use the Clausing lathe, it dawned on me that this ridiculous idea could, in fact, become a terrifying reality. So thanks to Anna Yu who taught me how to use the lathe, I made a bit with an 11mm bore to fit into the 1/2″ collet on the Shoptbot:

Having spent the time to make the part, it seemed silly to stop there, so I realized I’d have to make a post-processor for VCarve and Aspire (Fusion 360 coming soon!). I already had experience with Shopbot’s post-processors, creating a “Always turn spindle off” version of Ryan’s “Always turn spindle on” post processor as well as the XYZ Zero Finder program that works with the XYZ plate made on the Bridgeport. So hunkering down on the computer in the CNC Lounge (where Aspire is installed), I made a “Sharpie Bit” post processor that 1. always turns the spindle off, and 2. always sets Z to 0, regardless of what is done in Aspire or VCarve. This also means you have to explicitly set Z’s 0 position without use of the Z plate as there’s nothing to tell the machine when the ‘bit’ is at the right spot.

The first attempt was made using some cardboard I found in the garbage. This test did not go well because I had set Z to 0 in one corner of the cardboard, but because the cardboard was folded over, it was more puffy in the middle, which means that the Shopbot happily plunged the sharpie into the cardboard. Oops. Try #2 used a piece of acrylic that was laying around and I assumed was garbage, so I used that and the second attempt went much better. Inspired, I grabbed some acrylic from my shelf and made the version below.

I’m going to clean up the code a little (like removing a bunch of debugging stuff, unnecessary pauses, etc.,) and then will run it by Matt (CNC area host) and if he’s cool with it, the bit will go in the drawer and the post processor available to anyone using VCarve and Aspire.

07

05 2017

NERP Tonite: Replicape rev B!

Tonight at NERP, Elias Bakken of Intelligent Agent AS and Thing-printer, in Oslo, Norway, will tell us about the Replicape rev B. [http://wiki.thing-printer.com/index.php?title=Replicape_rev_B]

“Replicape is a high end 3D-printer electronics package in the form of
a Cape that can be placed on a BeagleBone Black. This page is about
the Major revision B. It has five high power and low noise stepper
motors with cool running MosFets and it has been designed to fit in
small spaces without active cooling and without the need for physical
access to the board once installed. That means no potentiometers to
trim or switches to flip.”

NERP is not exclusively Raspberry Pi, the small computer and embedded systems interest group at Pumping Station:One in Chicago. NERP meets every other Monday at 7pm at Pumping Station:One, 3519 N. Elston Ave. in Chicago. Find NERP and Pumping Station:One at
http:// www.meetup.com/NERP-Not-Exclusively-Raspberry-Pi/
and
http://pumpingstationone.org/
Doors open at 6:30pm. NERP is free and open to the public. Ed Bennett ed @ kinetics and electronics com Tags: electronics, embedded, NERP, Open Source, raspberry pi, hackerspace, Beagle Bone, Pumping Station One

27

03 2017

“Digit” Sensors

Knitted Finger Sensor from Jesse Seay on Vimeo.

I machine-knit these finger sleeves from a conductive yarn that changes resistance as the knit is stretched.

With this project, I wanted to design a glove that could be machine-knit for workshops cheaply and quickly, making a wearable bend sensor available to people with no textile skills.

With a range of sleeve sizes, users can select the sleeve with the best fit and resistance range for each digit. We attach flexible silicone wires by means of a snap press, and the wearer then sews the wire in place with a tapestry needle and yarn — very easy!  Once the sleeve is finished, the user can use the tapestry needle to easily sew the wire leads in place along a fingerless glove.

Get your own “digit” sensor at the PS:One workshop on March 25. Details and RSVP on Meetup.  (Workshop fee: $10.)

Jenna Boyles, Kyle Werle, and Christine Shallenberg beta-tested the sensors at Pumping Station: One. They selected sleeves for fit, then stitched on the wires themselves. Kyle and Christine were able to use the sensors to control an analog synth and a processing sketch.

More details here.

13

03 2017

Coloring Book Adventure

I am making a coloring book.  The way is fraught with fears, doubts, and time eating mechanical failuresFears of being unable to make my goals.  Doubt that my art is worth the investment of strangers.  Battles with an old scanner not being compatible with my computer.  Then a crashed computer bios that corrupted my RAID drive.  I lost a lot of files.  But I am winning.  I am winning thanks to very good friends who encouraged my talents.  I am winning with the support of my very wonderful family that helped me in times of need. I am winning because of my tenacity in the face of problems.  It is only a matter of time in this book battle of attrition.  “Today I Draw Dragons” will be a thing.

I will encourage you too to tread the path of book making.  Be not daunted by the endless tasks before you.

This project began when I started to draw dragons before work and then after work.  I began to count them.  I told myself that when I made thirty five of them I would pursue making them into a coloring book. I ended up making one hundred and fourteen of them.

I shopped around for publishers.  It is a sea of frustration.  You have your easiest ride if you can wrestle the support of a professional publishing company, but they will have a say in your product and it is hard to convince them that you are worth it.  So I decided to pursue self publishing, at least for now.  If I prove myself with a successful project, then I will show them what I can do.

None of this is the way to wealth but it is the way of artists.

Knittin’ Kitten

I learned many things.  I learned that even if I print only 30 dragon images it will be considered a 60 pages plus book to a printer even if I don’t print on both sides of the sheet of paper.  If you have a place to store 1000 books and the cash to buy and ship them then you might be able to get them printed for a competitive price.  ISBN numbers are expensive if you buy just one.

Advertising matters.  My Kickstarter shows a definite lull in support when my computer crashed and I could not reason out how to advertise without my scanned and worked drawings.  My friends and family took up the slack then.  I continued.  I made business cards and flyers to paint the town.  I wish I had done more.  But I am still winning.

Cleaning up and re-working scans for print TWICE is annoying.

I have an external hard drive now so I can back up the back ups.

planned cover image

Learning all the programs for formatting everything for print is a huge pain in my pinky toe.

I still have many tasks ahead.  I need to subscribe to a download service so that I can deliver my PDF. files.  I need to secure a high quality printer for the prints I have sold.  I need to prepare to wrap and mail out my books.  I need to make all the custom sketch cards and commissioned art sold to fund this endeavor.  I will need a plan in place to sell the extra copies I am going to order.  And I need to draw more, lots more.

This will not be my last publishing adventure, by far.

There are still a few more days if you want a copy of the book yourself:

“Today I Draw Dragons” By Shelly Loke

My Kickstarter Ends March 8th, but that is really just barely the beginning.  I hope to see your adventuresome projects up here too, soon.

Dragon Making Toast in the Style of the Ancients

 

05

03 2017

Drossel von Flügel Cosplay Project

After months of work, hours of troubleshooting 3D printers and lasers, as well as a lot of patience, I’m proud to present my completed cosplay mask of gynoid Drossel von Flügel. My friend Jaina helped me take pictures at Katsucon last weekend in National Harbor. (Yes, the same convention center, unfortunately)

Note: almost all images can be clicked for full size.

Skylar at Katsucon dressed as Drossel with a hoodie that says "I HEART HUMANS"

Skylar at Katsucon dressed as Drossel with a hoodie that says "I HEART HUMANS"

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


ByNEET's 3D model of Drossel Sky's picture of her Drossel Figma


A picture of the Drossel mask with the Drossel Figma next to it for reference I HEART HUMANS sweater with blue heart


I have received no shortage of help from various people. The CNC department at Pumping Station: One has been great at supporting those who want to make things. Twitter user @ByNEET released a full model of Drossel which my friend Faraday (she does 3D work! fortunafaradaze at gmail dot com) helped disassemble for conversion into 3d print friendly STL files. My friends who spent countless late nights with me while I worked on this project. My mom, who was very helpful in assembling the mounts to hold it on my head at the last minute. My friend Amir, who introduced me to Pumping Station: One which has made a huge impact on me. Lastly, the PS:One community itself, for maintaining such a wonderful place to create and share as a community.

Below the read-more is a fairly detailed explanation on how I created the mask and what tools I used for those who are interested in pursing similar projects. Feel free to contact me (Skylar) with questions at SKY at TUNA dot SH or find me at the space! I also have a (photography) website, http://hexbee.net.

Click the read more below!

Read the rest of this entry →

28

02 2017

Zen Woodworking Club’s Inaugural Meeting 02/13/2016

Welcome all woodworkers and would-be woodworkers to PS:One’s woodworking club, currently meeting Mondays at 6:00 p.m. and hosted by Wood Shop Authorizer, Andy L.

Thanks to all who attended the first meeting of the Zen Woodworking Club!
Many diverse woodworking interests represented, from furniture design, to carving, to antique tool restoration to tool making. We did a little tool sharpening and cut some dovetails and only lost 2 pints of blood (total)…

Here’s a guy I once met, who’s method I loosely copy for introducing dovetails.  You can also see a lot of stuff for our equipment wish list in his shop!  ~ Andy L.

Next week 2/20/16: Tool tune up and steam bending demo!
Sharpening of chisels, planes, wits. Letter carving in wood AND Joe’s steam bending box debut

 

 

 

 

 

19

02 2017

Pumping Station: One needs Makers for Maker Faire Chicago!

Maker Faire Chicago BadgeDo you make things at Pumping Station: One? Do you want to volunteer and help us show the awesomeness of PS:One at Maker Faire? We need you! Pumping Station: One will have a Makerspace booth at Maker Faire Chicago, April 22nd-23rd 2017, and we want to help you exhibit your stuff! Click HERE for our volunteer and exhibition form and let us know when you want to show your work, or when you’re free to help us set up and run our booth.

Call to MakersIf you have a larger project, or a demo, or something that you just want to show independently, you can go HERE to fill out an independent Maker Exhibit application, and make sure you let them know you want to be set up near the Pumping Station: One booth. We want a HUGE PS:One presence at this Chicago Maker Faire, so please, sign up, tell your friends, and let them know we need Makers!

31

01 2017

NERP Next: Up to Speed on Motors (Jan 30th)

If you’re a maker, hacker or DIY person, you don’t need to understand how a motor works “under the hood” to use it. However, a bit of theory will help you make the best design choices for your thing that runs in circles. At the next NERP, Jerry Morrow will bring us up to speed on motor technology.

 

Jerry’s presentation is a full overview of DC and Brushless DC (BLDC) motors and their associated drive circutriy.  Topics include the physics of electric motors, DC motor operation, motor bridges/inverters, control topologies, motor terminology, brushless DC motor operation, hall effect and encoder position feedback, current and velocity control, Park/Clarke transformations, and Space Vector Modulation (oooh..).

People need to make things go ’round. Car wheels, train wheels, drone propellers, compressors and fans in HVAC and refrigeration, hard drives (at least for the moment), reclining seats, robots, power tools, and on and on. Motors are everywhere. The variety of sizes, shapes, and internal structures is bewildering. About the only functional elements that the different types have in common is a moving part and a stationary part joined by a changing magnetic field. Whether or how you can controll the speed, direction, torque, or power consumption depends on the type of motor. Electric motors have been around for about 150 years. Most of the older classes of motor types are still in use, still useful, and still suited to new design.

We are seeing a revolution in motor technology. Software is eating the world, and it’s finding electric motors pretty tasty. The new generation of motors depends on embedded processors to the extent that the software is as much a part of the motor as the shaft. Sophisticated driver algorithms (and in some cases new materials) are making motors smaller, stronger, and more efficient. In addition to making better citizens of existing applications, the improvements open doors to new classes of applications.

Jerry Morrow is, or has been, a bass player, electrical and computer engineering student, home rehabber, sound technician, electro-mechanical actuation software engineer, Japanese student, father, and maker, and member of Pumping Station One,  He prefers the command line, VI editor, and makefiles over IDEs, and wont hold it against you if you don’t.

NERP is not exclusively Raspberry Pi, the small computer and embedded systems interest group at Pumping Station:One in Chicago. NERP meets every other Monday at 7pm at Pumping Station:One, 3519 N. Elston Ave. in Chicago. Find NERP and Pumping Station:One at

http:// www.meetup.com/NERP-Not-Exclusively-Raspberry-Pi/

and

http://pumpingstationone.org/

Doors open at 6:30pm. NERP is free and open to the public. Ed Bennett ed @ kinetics and electronics com Tags: electronics, embedded, NERP, Open Source, raspberry pi, hackerspace, Beagle Bone, Pumping Station One

23

01 2017

Celebrations in Pictures – PS:One March Potluck 5th Tuesday

More pictures……

5th Tues. on March

5th Tues. on March

5th Tues. on March

5th Tues. on March

5th Tues. on March

18

01 2017