‘Balance’ Coffee Table

Here’s a summary of my coffee table project that many of you have seen me work on (or struggle with) over for the last several months.

DCIM138GOPRO

I like furniture that can flex or modify it’s position to address different needs. I’ve seen coffee tables that raise to eating height before, but I wanted to design one that really expresses the mechanism and plays up the physics behind it. Back in October I made a 1/2 scale mock up of the design to understand the motion.

BCT-MOCKUP

Then it was back to designing a full size mock-up.

MOCK-UP-FULL

 

I realized it wasn’t going to be stable enough with just one set of arms, so I decided two sets would still look good. Everything was designed in Autodesk Revit. The software allows you to figure out volume, then with a given density of materials I could get weights from the various parts. This allowed me to determine the balance. I didn’t want it to be perfectly balanced with the counter-weight, but have enough weight to assist the movement.

COFFEE TABLE BALANCE-v2 side     CTB REVIT

First I started making the frame out of aluminum. It’s fastened using a pneumatic riveter.

FRAME-01FRAME-02

Painting the steel arms.

ARMS

CNC cutting the concrete forms out of pink foam

FOAM-01 FOAM-02

FOAM-03

Creating the concrete counter-weight form

counterwight-01

Failed attempt to CNC cut aluminum for brackets. I’ll skip the rest of these struggles…

counterweight-02

Casting the concrete base

casting-01

Casting the counterweight (nice and sloppy)

casting-02

The base assembled.

casting-03

casting-04

casting with arms

Frame is attached.

assembled-01

There were many tweaks after testing it. There was some wiggling around the axles, so I widened the holes in the steel arms to put nylon sleeve bearings in for a tighter smoother fit. There was still some shifting after putting some weight on the front, so I designed a locking mechanism with a latch.

CTB LATCH

Lots of struggle with this latch at the top of the photo. (FYI, learn the cold metals milling machine if you need a part like this)

locking mech

And finally… a video…

By Josh Myers

10

05 2016

NERP 5/9/16: Neurobionics Tonite: A Lightweight Robotic Knee Prosthesis that is Powered By Drone Technology

knee-exoskeleton

knee-exoskeleton

Elliott Rouse is the Director of the Neurobionics Lab in the Center for Bionic Medicine at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago. The vision of his group is to discover the fundamental science that underlies human joint dynamics during locomotion and incorporate these discoveries in novel, effective wearable robotic technologies.

At NERP on Monday, Elliott will show us some fun stuff from his lab including a new generation of his group’s robotic knee. We’ll see that a robotic knee is much more than a motorized linkage, although it is that, too.

quasi-passive pneumatic foot

quasi-passive pneumatic foot

Abstract: The Neurobionics Lab is interested in understanding neural control of movement from the lens of mechanical descriptions. The intent is to use these discoveries to design and control a new class of assistive technologies. These technologies would be capable of not only replicating the natural biological torques and speeds, but also the underlying stiffness properties. However, since many of the stiffness properties are unknown, the Neurobionics Lab also seeks to supplement this philosophy with the design and control of technologies that cleverly implement or leverage mechanics. The purpose of this talk will be to discuss ongoing research and a few specific technologies that are currently being developed in the group. The presentation will focus on two technologies, the actuation of wearable robots with balloons, and a novel low cost, lightweight robotic knee prosthesis that is powered by drone technology.

Bio: Elliott Rouse is the Director of the Neurobionics Lab in the Center for Bionic Medicine at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago and is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, as well as the Departments of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering at Northwestern University. The vision of his group is to discover the fundamental science that underlies human joint dynamics during locomotion and incorporate these discoveries in novel, effective wearable robotic technologies. The Neurobionics Lab uses technical tools from mechanical and biomedical engineering applied to the complex challenges of human augmentation, physical medicine, rehabilitation, and neuroscience. Elliott received the BS degree in mechanical engineering from The Ohio State University in 2007, and the MS and PhD degrees in biomedical engineering from Northwestern University in 2009 and 2012, respectively. Subsequently, he joined the Massachusetts Institute of Technology as a Postdoctoral Fellow, working with the Biomechatronics Group in the MIT Media Lab until 2014. Elliott and his research have been featured at TED, on the Discovery Channel, CNN, National Public Radio, Wired Magazine UK, Business Insider, and Odyssey Magazine.

NERP is not exclusively Raspberry Pi, the small computer and embedded systems interest group at Pumping Station:One in Chicago. NERP meets every other Monday at 7pm at Pumping Station:One, 3519 N. Elston Ave. in Chicago. Find NERP and Pumping Station:One at

http: //www.meetup.com/NERP-Not-Exclusively-Raspberry-Pi/
and
http://pumpingstationone.org/

Doors open at 6:30pm.
NERP is free and open to the public.
Ed Bennett ed @ kinetics and electronics com
Tags: electronics, embedded, NERP, Open Source,
raspberry pi, hackerspace, Beagle Bone, Pumping Station One, prosthetics

08

05 2016

501c3 Status Party – Thurs. April 28th

The cake, decorated by Shelly Loke. Before

This is the red velvet cake, decorated by Shelly L. She did a great job. Thanks to Everett for donating the chocolate that appears on every event cake so far.

 

 

The "original" song for PS:One.

The “original” song for PS:One. We actually sang this song before cutting the cake.

The table of tasty treats.

The table of tasty treats. Sorry for the blurry picture, the sugar content was making the camera jitter.

The cutting of the cake.

The cutting of the cake. Shelly did the honors.

After

Two hours later and the cake is almost gone.

We all gathered in the lounge to celebrate the hard work of many PS:1 boards and members. It seemed like a fitting end to getting 501c3 status so I planned a party. I chose red velvet cake because our color, as far as I know, is red. I could be wrong, it could have been purple and the blue ran away. Lol. Party guests brought doughnuts, plenty of doughnuts, pizza pringles, and kit kats. The cupcakes looked so fancy. We even had ice cream to go with the cake. With the help of Andy L. we sang our 501c3 song and it was a mouthful. Try it yourself. It was a very good evening for me and I hope you. To all who shared in the treats after the party. Salute!

02

05 2016

Power Racing Series Meeting

This Saturday, April 30th, we will meet at 9pm in the shop to discuss our entry into the Power Racing Series. Its a friendly competition between hackerspaces where we modify ride on kids toys and race them at Maker Faires.  We have a car that works great but is in need of TLC. We have a race in San Mateo in a few weeks time and need to get it ready.  We will be discussing what needs to be done for that race and races to come. If you have experience with welding, electronics, fabrication, you are more than welcome. If you don’t have experience, come by and get some.  Read the rest of this entry →

29

04 2016

NERP Tonite! Raspberry Pi with 3D Resin Printing, Big and Small

A few days ago, Andrew arranged the donation of a ZBuilder ulTra 3d resin printer to PS:One. Since Andrew has been working on small a table-top 3-d resin printer using the Raspberry Pi and nanoDLP, it seemed natural to try the nanoDLP controller on the big machine.

3dprinter-00

3dprinter-01

As far as we know this retrofit is a new use case for the RPi.

3dprinter-04

3dprinter-02

I found the build platform motor leads and Andrew connected them to the nanoDLP system. With a bit of fiddling, the platform started to move as expected. Meanwhile Andrew had a good start on getting the projector to run, and before we were really ready, the essential system components seemed to work. (In the pic below, you can see the the Raspberry Pi logo displaying on the build platform.)

3dprinter-03

It’s already clear that there are lots of details that need addressing, but those problems seem surmountable.

———————-

Andrew Camardella camardea at gmail) is a contract industrial designer and digital fabricator. He works with companies and individuals conceptualizing, creating, and managing new products, taking ideas from sketch to prototype to finished product. He is an expert in the application of 3D processes and technologies to traditional design methods.

NERP is not exclusively Raspberry Pi, the small computer and embedded systems interest group at Pumping Station:One in Chicago. NERP meets every other Monday at 7pm at Pumping Station:One, 3519 N. Elston Ave. in Chicago. Find NERP and Pumping Station:One at

http: //www.meetup.com/NERP-Not-Exclusively-Raspberry-Pi/
and
http://pumpingstationone.org/

Doors open at 6:30pm.
NERP is free and open to the public.
Ed Bennett ed @ kinetics and electronics com
Tags: electronics, embedded, NERP, Open Source,
raspberry pi, hackerspace, Beagle Bone, Pumping Station One

25

04 2016

NERP Tonite! Report from the 2016 Embedded Linux Conference and IoT Summit

NERP is not exclusively Raspberry Pi, the small computer and embedded systems interest group at Pumping Station:One in Chicago. NERP meets every other Monday at 7pm at Pumping Station:One, 3519 N. Elston Ave. in Chicago.

April 4th through 6th, PS:One’s Drew Fustini attended the Open Internet of Things and Embedded Linux Conference (OpenIoT & ELC 2016) in San Diego. Since embedded Linux powers pretty much all the OS-capable single board computers and computer modules that we see at NERP, we’re eager to hear Drew’s insights on how current advancements and innovation in embedded Linux and hardware will help us at NERP make cool stuff that nobody’s thought of yet.

http://events.linuxfoundation.org/events/embedded-linux-conference
http://openiotelc2016.sched.org/

Find NERP and Pumping Station:One at
http://www.meetup.com/NERP-Not-Exclusively-Raspberry-Pi/
and
http://pumpingstationone.org/
Doors open at 6:30pm.
NERP is free and open to the public.
Ed Bennett ed @ kinetics and electronics com
Tags: electronics, embedded, NERP, Open Source,
raspberry pi, hackerspace, Beagle Bone, Pumping Station One, IoT

11

04 2016

Creative Celebrations at the 7th Birthday Party!

Cake-is-not-a-lie-01

WP-White-Bar-550x10

People trickled in through the evening and participated in events for our 7th Birthday Party last weekend! Grilled meats, snacks and vegan pizza were served up to the mingling masses. Lockpicking with TOOOL.us went down, a group mural went up, games were played, dyes went into fabric and a familiar face returned to our space…

Read the rest of this entry →

05

04 2016

Passap Knitting Machine Set Up

IMG_0291

The Passap is officially working!
(Huzzah!)

Last night we tested settings that work with the fingering weight Tamm 3ply coned yarn. And we figured out how to knit from cones (no cake winding required)!

Setting up the machine:

Beds needs to be at “full pitch”. This means the combs of the two beds are lined up opposite each other. To do that, turn the crank handle at the lower left of the machine so the handle is “up”, at the top of its rotation.

Park the carriage (“Lock” in Passap lingo) on the right. For both locks: set the tension dial to 3. There’s a large lever marked N-X. Flip it to N (“normal”). Insert the orange strippers.

IMG_0293

Read the rest of this entry →

23

02 2016

CNC Beer Part 3 – Fusion 360 and Waterjet Overkill

Waterjet cut box and panel insert

Waterjet cut box and panel insert

[Go back to Part 2….]

I had a plan for how to blog about this project, but I’m going to step out of order and talk about the latest development since it pertains to the last Fusion 360 Meetup. So to catch up in a hurry: I’ve already constructed a control box containing an Arduino Mega 2560 and a Raspberry Pi, power supplies, relays, etc. all mounted on DIN rails. This is the “brains” of the system, and the Pi runs an open source control framework called EPICS. The control box sits on a separate stand on wheels that I welded. In keeping with the “Beer Church” theme, I suppose this is the “Beer Pulpit”.

Beer control box and stand

Beer control box and stand

I realized early on that the control box was out of room. I want this brewing system to be modular so that I can attach different equipment and reconfigure everything via software. To that end, each device needs to connect to the control box with its own sturdy, detachable connector. The original BrewTroller project (which isn’t online anymore) made use of XLR jacks. These are ideal. Nearly every device I’m interfacing with uses 3 or, in some cases, 2 wires. The OneWire serial bus, which is used for measuring temperatures, uses a 3 pin M12 connector; these are chained together using splitters. A few use cases need more than 3 wires: multiple pressure transducers on one board (used for fluid level sensors) and stepper motor drivers (used for controlling gas needle valves). For these, I’m using 8 pin mic connectors. But I don’t have enough panel space on the control box for all of these jacks, especially now that I’m considering adding a small touch screen. Nor do I have room inside the control box to mount a 120 V to 24 V transformer; 24 VAC is a HVAC standard, and the propane burner valves need it.

Read the rest of this entry →

21

02 2016

Event: Confectionery Combat! Chocolate VS Shelly and Gerald

shelly-and-gerald-vs-chocolate-smaller

 

What:
Confectionery Combat! Chocolate VS Shelly and Gerald:

When:
Friday February 12, 6:30-8:30 pm

 

We will start with a discussion on the evil ways of this culinary foe and tactics to successfully wage war against it.

We will be making truffles, roasting nuts, coating lots of things with chocolate, and “practicing” our feeble double boiler tempering skills.  Practice is the word! Just as in war there is no guarantee of success but at least in this we will have chocolate.

This event is open to PS:One members and their guests who want to watch, sample, and participate as the space allows. (There will probably be a cap at 10 people in that small kitchen) If you know you are coming give us a holler on the member group here so we can prepare excess supplies and plan our battle strategy.  The cost is free but donations to fund our efforts will encourage more such campaigns.

06

02 2016