Archive for the ‘Class/Workshop’Category

2015 Detroit Makerfaire

We had a great year at Detroit Makerfaire and ran out of our kits in about 3 hours everyday. Thanks to all of the volunteers who headed out and helped teach other Makers about our noisemaker kits!

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After a successful Makerfaire in Detroit, please keep in mind that the next Makerfaire is coming up quick. This is the South Side Mini Makerfaire, Saturday August 8th at the Ford City Hall. We need both donations and volunteers! Please email jenny@pumpingstationone.org if you are interested.

28

07 2015

Woodshop @ Pumping Station: One

When I took over the Pumping Station: One wood shop (a little more than 2 years ago), I started making cutting boards as my metric on how functional the shop is. I reasoned that it’s an excellent entry level project, and most of the users of the shop would be people with no woodworking experience. The first boards I made at the space were pretty good, but every step was a chore. The jointer could never stay sharp for more than a month, the planer required weekly maintenance, dust collection was a hassle, and it took 10 minutes of setup to do jobs that should take only seconds. Well, little by little, training, equipment upgrades and accumulation, shop days, and community has made the shop much easier and safer to use. My most recent cutting board demonstrates what the shop is capable of.

Last year, one of my favorite coworkers invited me to her wedding, and I decided that I’d make her something special. After discovering the color scheme in her kitchen, I chose padauk, purpleheart, and cherry and made a design in a free cutting board design program.

cutting board

To prevent the wood from warping while in service, I milled the wood square (rectangular, really, but it’s woodworking jargon) and let it dry for two weeks in the shop.

lumber used

As expected, the boards warped again as they dried. I milled them again and two weeks later, they were still square, so they were ready to glue up. After the initial glue up, I had a board that looked like the top board in the design program. I planed down one side of the glued-up board with handplanes and then ran it through the planer the board was flat. At that point, I set up the tablesaw sled to cut the board into $1 \frac{5}{16}$ inch wide strips. I created the pattern by flipping every other strip.

cut boards

After cutting the edge-joined board into strips, I glued up those strips and gave my board to a friend who ran the board through his 40 inch drum sander, to flatten down the glued up strips. My target thickness was $1 \frac{1}{4}$ inches, so I was thrilled with the $1.227$ inches that I achieved. At that point, I used a handplane to clean up the edges, and took an obligatory picture of my handplane with the produced shavings.

almost hit my mark

shaving porn

After getting the board milled to the desired dimensions, I set up the router table to cut handholds. After the handholds were cut, it was time to sand. And sand. And sand. And then sand a little bit more. After about 10 hours of sanding, I decided that I was going to get an angle grinder style rotary sander and handle that work in maybe an hour for all future boards. When I was content with the smoothness of the board, I soaked the board in mineral oil overnight, to seal the board against water. At the end of the soak, I wiped away as much mineral oil as I could, although the board kept bleeding mineral oil for about a day. At that point, I used a mixture of mineral oil and beeswax to seal the board and create the beautiful finish that I achieved. I applied the mixture, waited for it to haze (I waited about 90 minutes), and then wiped as much away as I could. Then I sanded using waterproof 1000 grit paper, which buffed the finish and filled in any potential gaps. Then I used a polisher to polish the board until I achieved a glassy finish. Project complete.

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color shot

corner defect

gloss handle examination

 

27

07 2015

This Thursday: Light Up Your Work with DIY LEDs

If you want to learn to use LEDs, here’s your chance. This Thursday in Pilsen, I’m teaching a free workshop on them, covering basic electronics theory, diagrams, and breadboarding circuits. (the pix are from last week’s workshop, same thing.)

I’m exploring LEDs in eTextiles so instead of soldering, we’ll finish by breaking out the copper tape, conductive ink, and stainless steel thread. (Everyone gets free samples to take home.)

Participants will learn to design a basic LED circuit, choose appropriate components, and embed circuitry into projects using fiber and paper craft tools. After a crash-course in basic electronic theory, participants can opt to test their circuits out on breadboards and experiment with conductive thread, ink, fabric, and adhesives that are designed for flexible circuit-making. Workshop attendees are invited to bring in their own works-in-progress and/or materials for experimentation.

Parking is free of charge. Entrance to Mana Contemporary is on the east side of the building. Please press bell to be buzzed in. Front desk staff will be available to give directions to the Workshop Space.

 This event is free and open to the public. Registration required.

Hosted by: Artist Jesse Seay, UIC Free Art School, and the UIC Maker Space Residency at Mana Contemporary Chicago

The workshop is free but RSVP is required.

And next week at PS:One…

On Monday, July 13, I’ll be hosting: Stitch n’ Solder, from 7-9pm.This is a casual hang out to work on your own electronics, knitting machine, and e-textiles projects. Trade advice, troubleshoot, and socialize. Visit the link for details, please.  (This is open office hours, not a workshop.)

 

05

07 2015

B.Y.O.T. Tie Dye Summer Event, Friday, 7/3/2015

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Bring your own t-shirt, or other white item, and fill it with fabric dye! B.Y.O.T. Tie Dye Summer Event with be Friday, 7/3/2015, from 6:00 – 9:00 pm in the upstairs arts and crafts area, a free event for members. A 100% cotton item works best such as a clean t-shirt, socks, a hat, apron., etc. Washing items is helpful if they are newly purchased but avoid fabric softener, which is oily and repels dye. Twelve bright colors in easy applicator bottles and all other materials will be provided for you to hand color your item.

27

06 2015

Lark Dord Day

#include <stdbeerchurchannounce.h>

OK, so you probably didn’t get tickets to a certain event on Saturday in Munster, IN, and want to commiserate by drinking and brewing beer. Or, maybe you did, and you want a good excuse to drink a certain limited edition beer you just acquired with people who will immediately become your best friends! *hint hint* So come to Beer Church’s Lark Dord Day!

We will attempt a brave and daring feat for the first time in PS:One history – brewing a Russian Imperial Stout. And not just any Russian Imperial Stout. The goal: to brew a beer so alcoholic it poses a fire hazard, with a mouth feel comparable to 15w30 motor oil, that is darker than the CEO of Comcast’s soul!

Noon-ish, this Sunday. 21+ only. Etc. 12:30 PM.

In nomine Barley,
Ryan
Beer Pope (Eastern Orthodox)

25

04 2015

Let’s Drink and Learn About: Sangiovese

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Italian Chianti – Chianti wine always either mostly or entirely made of Sangiovese

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Italian Sangiovese from outside Chianti – Over 10% of Italy’s total wine production is Sangiovese

For the fourth installment of our monthly adult beverage appreciation event, “Let’s Drink and Learn About…”, we did a tasting of several different Sangiovese wines.  If you missed it, feel free to peruse our class notes!

Our next session will cover red Bordeaux, and its 5 constituent grapes (Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Cabernet Franc, Petit Verdot, and Malbec).  This will be a joint event with South Side Hackerspace: Chicago, and will be hosted in their space (2233 S Throop St #214).  As per usual, it will be on the 3rd Friday (March 20th), and will begin at 7 PM.  There is no cost to attend the event, but please bring a bottle of wine (Cabernet Sauvignon or Merlot, please) to contribute to the tasting.  You can find more info, or RSVP for the event, on our Meetup!

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Vino Nobile di Montepulciano – A more subtle and complex expression of Sangiovese from a region just to the south of Chianti

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Super Tuscan – A Tuscan wine made without at least 70% Sangiovese. This was actually predominately Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot, similar to what we’ll be drinking in March!

 

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25

02 2015

Cryptoparty: March 14th, 2015 at 2:00 PM

cryptopartyLearn how to communicate securely and privately at Cryptoparty! In a world where legal and corporate protections for privacy have eroded, it is up to us to take privacy into our own hands. Cryptoparties are a global effort to educate everyday people about electronic privacy tools.

At this Cryptoparty, South Side Hackerspace member Brian Kroll will be going over how to send and receive encrypted secure e-mails with GNU Privacy Guard (GPG). This will be a hands-on presentation, so be sure to bring your laptop. For those of you without a computer, Brian will also cover e-mail encryption on an Android mobile device.

Toward the end of the event, Freddy Martinez will present on TextSecure. TextSecure is a mobile application that allows you to communicate securely over text messaging. Be sure to bring your phone if you want to setup and exchange key information using this app.

Please note, a reporter and photographer from the Chicago Reader will be present. Unless you decide otherwise, the reporter will not include information that might uniquely identify you. You will also be warned when photographs will be taken and will have the opportunity to remove yourself from any shot.

This is a party, so feel free to bring food, drink, and beer for yourself or to share.

20

02 2015

2/15/15 – Inaugural Tanning Station: One leathercraft interest group meeting

Update: 2/15/15
Due to illness, this will be postponed to a later date. Sorry for the late notice.
-Ryan
Due to a strong showing of interest, we will be holding the first Tanning Station: One leather craft interest group meeting on Sunday, February 15th! We will meet in the textiles workshop upstairs at 7pm.
What is TS:One?
  • A forum for sharing experience and knowledge about leather, leather crafting, tooling, and leather-related topics
  • A group of craftsmen and craftswomen who will share their projects and give constructive criticism
  • A place to find project inspirations and/or help others with their projects
If you’re interested, please come at 7pm on Sunday, 2/15. Additionally, if you are experienced in leather crafting and would like to demonstrate a skill or discuss something interesting, please email me at rasputin243 [dot] gmail [dot] com or comment on this post! I would like to have one or two people present during the first meeting.
For more information, check out our wiki article!
See you on Sunday, 2/15!

06

02 2015

CNC Build Club – 2/5/2015 7:00pm

This month’s CNC Build Club meeting will be a demo night.  Bring something to show.  It can be a project you finished, something you made, a work in process or something we might think is cool.

I will be bringing several things I have recently completed.

The bipolar ORD Bot: This is a CNC machine I built for 2015 ORD Camp.  It is a super simple drawing machine with some fun math behind the motion.

The DC Power Supply Interface: This is something I did for Inventables that we will be selling soon.   It really cleans up the wiring when you use a DC power supply on a CNC machine.

The TB6600 Stepper Driver Shield:  This is another Inventables project.  The TB6600 can do a ton of cool CNC stuff.  Now you can interface it to the free grbl CNC controller.

The CNC Club is a monthly meeting of Chicago area people passionate about learning, building and using digital fabrication equipment.  It is held at the Pumping Station One Hackerspace.  It is open to non members.  We also have a Google Group called CNC Build Club.

Each meeting we talk about, build, train on and use CNC machines.  We have 3D printers, laser cutters, CNC routers and vinyl cutters.  Come out and join the fun.

Please RSVP on Meetup.  I will have a CNC or Inventables related door prize to a random person who RSVPs and is present at the meeting.

01

02 2015

Really Late Wine Tasting Follow-Up

So last last Friday, the 16th, member Kyle Bieneman held a wine tasting class on Pinot Noir. I’ve been meaning to get this post up earlier, but enjoy the pictures and information from the handout:

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“It’s…thin-skinned, temperamental, ripens early. It’s, you know, it’s not a survivor like Cabernet, which can just grow anywhere and uh, thrive even when it’s neglected. No, Pinot needs constant care and attention. You know? And in fact it can only grow in these really specific, little, tucked away corners of the world. And, and only the most patient and nurturing of growers can do it, really. Only somebody who really takes the time to understand Pinot’s potential can then coax it into its fullest expression. Then, I mean, oh its flavors, they’re just the most haunting and brilliant and thrilling and subtle and…ancient on the planet.” –Miles Raymond, Sideways

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Note: From Burgundy

The grape: Pinot Noir grows in tightly packed bunches (the “Pinot” in the name refers to the pinecone shape of the bunches). These tight bunches tend to be somewhat more susceptible to disease. Being thin-skinned, the grape is also at great risk from extremes in temperature. Fortunately, as it ripens early, it can be grown in cooler regions than heartier grapes (like Cabernet Sauvignon).

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Color: For red wines, color comes from the skins (it is not naturally present in the juice) in a process called “extraction.” Grapes go through a machine called a “crusher-destemmer,” and rather than being juiced as with white wine, the pulpy mass is then fermented in giant vats. Note that the skins will naturally float to the top, forming a “cap,” requiring some kind of system to circulate the fermenting juice (whether a “punch-down,” a “pump-over,” or some sort of a mixer).

Sometime after fermentation has completed, the “free run” is drained off. The remaining “pomace” is then pressed to extract all the remaining liquid. The free liquid is generally light in flavor and color than the pressed liquid, and so will often be aged separately, being blended only at the end to fine-tune before bottling.

Pinot Noir is thin-skinned with less color (anthocyanin) in the skins, it tends to extract less color, and thus is paler than most red wines. Being lighter in flavor, some winemakers will even leave the stems in for fermentation to impart more “tannins.”

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Tannins: Tannins are much more present in red wine than white wine, partly because they come from the skins during extraction (as well as seeds and stems, if present), and the oak barrels during aging. Tannins are traditionally used to turn hides into leather (“tanning”), hence the name. This is why bitter red wines often make your tongue feel dry and leathery. The “resolving” of tannins is a prime reason why many red wines get better with age.

Pinor Noir is notably low in tannins, and so some winemakers will leave the stems in for fermentation.

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Note: Australian

Flavors in Pinot Noir: As a lighter, more delicate wine, flavors tend toward the redder fruits such as cherry, strawberry, and raspberry. Less prominent notes might include vegetal (beets, green tomatoes, olives) or earthy (truffles, barnyard) flavors. Pinot does not typically display the darker fruit (plum) or spicier notes (cigar box) of other red wines. As a result of its lighter flavors, it tends to pair well with pork and fowl, rather than beef.

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Burgundy: Pinot Noir originates from Burgundy, a region in the east of France, between Champagne to the north, and Beaujolais to the south. Burgundy is divided into four major sub-regions (from north to south, and highest to lowest quality): Cote de Nuits, Cote de Beaune, Cote Chalonnaise, and Maconnais.

However, Burgundies will generally be labeled by their village, of which there are too many to list. There are about 600 “Premier Cru” vineyards across Burgundy, and only 32 “Grand Crus,” which will be more expensive, and generally superior to, the villages. The Premier and Grand Crus are designated by the French government based on the reputation of past production.

The Grand Cru red Burgundies are some of the most expensive and sought-after wines in the world, costing nearly $1000 a bottle in good years.

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Thanks again to Kyle for these notes.

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01 2015