Posts Tagged ‘beer’

July Beer Church

The opening round

The opening round

In this month’s edition of Beer Church, the bombers flowed smoothly as we started off with the beer tasting:

After several rounds of tasting, we headed to Brew & Grow to start on our Brown Ale.  If you’ve never gone to Brew & Grow, this brew shop will have everything you need to start your own batch of beer from start to finish.



Gathering our ingredients entailed grabbing a cart with a bucket and scale attached and digging through our recipe book to catch all of our various grains needed for the mash.  We also grabbed some yeast and hops pellets to finish up our collecting.  Of course when you go to Brew & Grow you can sample some of their brews while you shop.

Wort Prep

Wort Prep

While the wort was being prepared I then decided it was grilling time!

Roll burgers into balls

Roll burgers into balls

Using a 75% / 25% fat mix, the beef was rolled into giant meat balls for smashing.

Smash into patties

Smash into patties

Once the burgers are made into balls, it’s time to smash them down and evening out the edges to make solid patties that will not disintegrate or crumble on the flame.  Salt, pepper, cajun seasoning were added on both sides of the burger.

Grill, flip only once and add cheese

Grill, flip only once and add cheese

Once the charcoal (which was started before the burgers were started) turns white, the lighter fluid should have burnt off and the grill is ready for use.  Toss on the buns to toast them but pay attention or they can scorch to a crisp.  Toss on the burgers with a spatula and note that the center is the hottest area so burgers are susceptible to scorching if you’re not careful.



Medium Rare

Medium Rare

Add condiments if necessary, and avoid shrinkage by removing the burgers before they are charred to a crisp.  Grill flame can get up to 500 degrees, so watch out or you or your food may get burnt!


Back in brewing land, while the mash was settling, the kettle was loaded with water and lit to reach 190 degrees.


After letting the wort settle, it was time to separate the sugars from the grain.


In sparging we rinse the grain with hot water that is about 170 degrees, using the wrong temp can result in unwanted consequences!


After the wort is in the kettle we turn back on the turkey fryer in order to begin the sterilization process and killing off bacteria.  As we mix the wort with a giant paddle, the heat coming from the turkey fryer singes everyone’s shins.

Pumping wort to carboy

Once the wort is heated up, we then cool it down by pumping cold water through the copper coils to bring the temperature back down.  Once the temperature drops, we then pump the remainder  through a tube into the carboy.

Here our decision to use pellet hops cause a lot of blockages in the tubes.  Using a mesh or filter bag on the pellet hops may have prevented some blockage but we were able to get most of the wort out into the carboy and did not smash it.

The ring of shame

The ring of shame

From last Beer Church we got to this final end stage and this handle failed causing the carboy to fall and smash all over the shop floor.  We were not to be tricked again and employed a harness setup to prevent any dropping.

Overall another successful Beer Church, we now have beer in progress which will be ready to be tapped soon.  Next iteration will use Creeping Charlie as the bittering agent in lieu of hops so it will be interesting to see how these two beers compare when it’s time.

If you are interested in beer or brewing, make sure to stop by next month’s edition of Beer Church!


07 2016

Raising the BAR

New Bar Front ViewIt all began with a dream: a cerebral lubrication station worthy of our fine hackerspace, serving as focal point to transform the lounge from a seldom used area into PS:One’s central communal nexus. From there, a collaborative project was born. PS:One member Greg Daneau built the first incarnation of our bar. He built the bar top from an unfinished door, an open frame supported it, and it had a foot rail made of pipe. The result was impressive, even if it was but a small shadow of the glory that the bar ultimately became. Thus began an asynchronous collaborative project, with hacker inspiring hacker to hack the bar to higher pinnacles of zymurgical greatness. And it arguably served as an “altar” for the budding Beer Church.

Kegerator InteriorSeeing the bar in all its inebriating glory inspired member Ryan Pierce to build a draft system and kegerator from a donated refrigerator. It can hold up to six 5-gallon Cornelius kegs (used frequently by homebrewers) or a single 15.5-gallon beer keg. A fan forces cold air through an insulated hose carrying the beverage lines to the draft tower. The draft tower itself was built from PVC pipe, fittings, and drain flanges. An insulated return hose carries the air back to the refrigerator. This air loop keeps the beverage lines and taps cold, which reduces the tendency of beer to foam in the line. Jeremy used our TIG welder to weld a drain pipe to a stainless steel drip tray, directing any spills into a bucket.

The existence of the bar and draft system steered the focus of Beer Church towards kegging. Cornelius kegs can hold finished beer and can be used for natural carbonation (caused by additional secondary fermentation from priming sugar) or forced carbonation supplied directly from a CO2 tank.

Read the rest of this entry →

Tags: ,


09 2013

NERP – Raspberry Pi and Beer – Monday 9-10-12

RPi beer temp controller

The next NERP (Not Exclusively Raspberry Pi) meeting will be at 7pm Monday Sept. 10th. See the NERP Meetup page for more information on location, meeting format, etc.

NERP is Not Exclusively Raspberry Pi, and this Monday’s meeting will also discuss Android and beer.

During fermentation beer must be kept at fairly precisely controlled temperatures. The required temperature varies with the stage of fermentation and other factors.

Any self-respecting beer temperature monitor would be accessible from the ‘net, and this one is no exception. Monday, Eric Stein will show Brewing Station: One’s  Raspberry Pi based temperature monitor and controller. Eric will show how the Python code and electronics work and discuss some issues around controlling temperature. Sampling the product will have to wait until Beer Church taps the keg.

The Desktop is DEAD, Long live the Desktop: The Android 4.0 miniPC

Jay will be doing a short walk-thru and talk about the user-land experience with the new Ricomagic MK802 thumb-drive-sized pocket-computer. Jay will be demoing android 4.x, Fedora, Ubuntu and/or puppy linux on the Ricomagic MK802. The Ricomagic MK802 is a $65 Cortex A8 1GHZ processor with 1GB of DDR3 Ram, 4 GB flash, wifi and a 500MH GPU (Mali 400) with HDMI video. The small computing landscape is changing fast, and the Raspberry Pi is only part of the story.


09 2012