Archive for the ‘Events’Category

1971 Movie Night

“Before Watergate, Wikileaks, and Edward Snowden, there was Media, Pennsylvania.”

For our next movie night we’d like to screen the documentary 1971: “On March 8, 1971 eight ordinary citizens broke into an FBI office in Media, Pennsylvania, a town just outside Philadelphia, took hundreds of secret files, and shared them with the public. In doing so, they uncovered the FBI’s vast and illegal regime of spying and intimidation of Americans exercising their First Amendment rights.”

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Adam Forsyth, the son of one of the eight, who called themselves the Citizens’ Commission, will be giving a talk after the screening. The screening is open to the public and BYOB. Some snacks will be provided.

Sign up for the movie here:

When: Sunday April 19th, 5 PM
Where: Pumping Station: One Electronics Lab upstairs

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04 2015

International Tabletop Day 2015

International tabletop day

International Tabletop Day

Want to hang out with a group of fun geeky people at a Hackerspace and play some awesome games? How about homemade snacks and homebrew beer? Still not awesome enough for you? Well, how about we hack an Xbox Kinect and scan you, then 3D print a custom game piece with your face on it, or make custom game counters on a laser cutter?

Come on by Pumping Station: One, Chicago’s biggest Hackerspace, on April 11th and have some fun and maybe even learn a few skills! Bring your favorite games, or if you want some supreme geeky-points, bring a game you designed and play-test it with us [we can even discuss how to spruce-up your game with lasercut or 3D printed pieces, hint-hint]!

This event is public, so bring your family, friends, or just awesome gamers you know and wanna hang out with! If you want to take part in making the 3D printed game pieces, or laser cutting custom counters, we do ask for a minimum of $1 suggested donation to cover materials. If you want to see this stuff continue into the future, please donate more! Proceeds will go to Pumping Station: One’s donation box.


04 2015

Saturday 3/21: Chicago GNU/Linux User Group meeting


WHEN: Saturday March 21, 2015, at 02:00 PM

Linux Charcuterie – How the Linux Sausage is Made

Ian McLeod will take a look at the entire chain of building a distribution from start to finish, exploring how source is packaged and built, and then complex combinations of packages are joined together to make a cohesive Linux distribution. His talk will include include details of how this all works in a diverse set of environments – from aging x86 hardware to public cloud environments, Linux containers, and immutable systems.

Fedora and Project Atomic

Sten Turpin will build on Ian’s talk, giving an overview of Red Hat’s new, container-focused platform, Project Atomic. Basing his talk around the Fedora-based version of the project, he’ll demonstrate how to deploy and use Project Atomic on the Amazon AWS infrastructure.


We will have food! Probably pizza! At least a few of us typically bring some beverage to share, as well. We’re a community-run organization, so we recommend bringing a few dollars if you’d like to partake of the food. No one will be denied a slice of tasty pizza for inability to chip-in, though.

Here is the event on

March Meeting of the ChicagoLUG

Saturday, Mar 21, 2015, 2:00 PM

Pumping Station One
3519 N Elston Chicago, IL

17 Free Software Users Attending

We will have two talks at this meeting:Ian McLeod (Red Hat) will an give an end-to-end explanation of how Fedora is constructed and released.Sten Turpin (Red Hat) will be presenting a demo of Fedora Atomic with Cockpit and Docker running on AWS.

Check out this Meetup →

Original post:

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03 2015

Pi Day Party – Recap

Thanks to Lyn and everyone who came for an awesome Pi Day celebration this past Saturday, 3/14/15. This year is an extra special Pi Day since we had pi to 4 digits (3.1415).

Skittles and Justin make an Irish Car Bomb pie

The final result

Raspberry pie

Pie cutting

Flourless chocolate cake in front

Raspberry close up


We had 3 apple pies

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03 2015

Movie Night: Citizenfour


It’s Movie Night Time! This is an Oscar-award winning documentary by Laura Poitras about her and journalist Glenn Greenwald’s encounters with Edward Snowden as he reveals the extent of the NSA’s surveillance program in 2013.

More information about the film:

When: Sunday March 1st, 2015 5 PM
Feel free to BYOB. Afterwards there will be discussion. This event is open to the public.

Sign up for the meetup:

Where: PS:One Lounge

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Reddit AMA:

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02 2015

Bring-A-Hack meetup on Feb. 25th

Hackaday and Pumping Station: One are bringing the Bring-A-Hack tradition to Chicago!


Sophi (left) at Bring-A-Hack following World Maker Faire (NYC) in 2014

Come hang out with friends in Hardware, Making and Hackaday!  We will have drinks and pizza and hacks.

Bring your blinky demos and sign up for a lightening talk (5 minutes or less).

Sophi Kravitz from Hackaday will be in town to talk about the Hackaday Prize.


Hackaday Prize in 2014 offered a trip space!

Wednesday, February 25th, 2015, 6 – 9 pm

Pumping Station: One hackerspace
3519 North Elston Avenue
Chicago, IL 60618

This event is Free and Open to the Public.  Please RSVP on the page for the event, so that we will know about how many people to expect:

Bring-A-Hack meetup

Wednesday, Feb 25, 2015, 6:00 PM

Upstairs of Pumping Station One
3519 N. Elston Ave Chicago, IL

12 Members Attending

From blog post: and Pumping Station: One are bringing the Bring-A-Hack tradition to Chicago!Come hang out with friends in Hardware, Making and Hackaday! We will have drinks and pizza and hacks.Bring your blinky demos and sign up for a lightening talk (5 minutes or less…

Check out this Meetup →



02 2015

2/15/15 – Inaugural Tanning Station: One leathercraft interest group meeting

Update: 2/15/15
Due to illness, this will be postponed to a later date. Sorry for the late notice.
Due to a strong showing of interest, we will be holding the first Tanning Station: One leather craft interest group meeting on Sunday, February 15th! We will meet in the textiles workshop upstairs at 7pm.
What is TS:One?
  • A forum for sharing experience and knowledge about leather, leather crafting, tooling, and leather-related topics
  • A group of craftsmen and craftswomen who will share their projects and give constructive criticism
  • A place to find project inspirations and/or help others with their projects
If you’re interested, please come at 7pm on Sunday, 2/15. Additionally, if you are experienced in leather crafting and would like to demonstrate a skill or discuss something interesting, please email me at rasputin243 [dot] gmail [dot] com or comment on this post! I would like to have one or two people present during the first meeting.
For more information, check out our wiki article!
See you on Sunday, 2/15!


02 2015

CNC Build Club – 2/5/2015 7:00pm

This month’s CNC Build Club meeting will be a demo night.  Bring something to show.  It can be a project you finished, something you made, a work in process or something we might think is cool.

I will be bringing several things I have recently completed.

The bipolar ORD Bot: This is a CNC machine I built for 2015 ORD Camp.  It is a super simple drawing machine with some fun math behind the motion.

The DC Power Supply Interface: This is something I did for Inventables that we will be selling soon.   It really cleans up the wiring when you use a DC power supply on a CNC machine.

The TB6600 Stepper Driver Shield:  This is another Inventables project.  The TB6600 can do a ton of cool CNC stuff.  Now you can interface it to the free grbl CNC controller.

The CNC Club is a monthly meeting of Chicago area people passionate about learning, building and using digital fabrication equipment.  It is held at the Pumping Station One Hackerspace.  It is open to non members.  We also have a Google Group called CNC Build Club.

Each meeting we talk about, build, train on and use CNC machines.  We have 3D printers, laser cutters, CNC routers and vinyl cutters.  Come out and join the fun.

Please RSVP on Meetup.  I will have a CNC or Inventables related door prize to a random person who RSVPs and is present at the meeting.


02 2015

Really Late Wine Tasting Follow-Up

So last last Friday, the 16th, member Kyle Bieneman held a wine tasting class on Pinot Noir. I’ve been meaning to get this post up earlier, but enjoy the pictures and information from the handout:

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“It’s…thin-skinned, temperamental, ripens early. It’s, you know, it’s not a survivor like Cabernet, which can just grow anywhere and uh, thrive even when it’s neglected. No, Pinot needs constant care and attention. You know? And in fact it can only grow in these really specific, little, tucked away corners of the world. And, and only the most patient and nurturing of growers can do it, really. Only somebody who really takes the time to understand Pinot’s potential can then coax it into its fullest expression. Then, I mean, oh its flavors, they’re just the most haunting and brilliant and thrilling and subtle and…ancient on the planet.” –Miles Raymond, Sideways

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Note: From Burgundy

The grape: Pinot Noir grows in tightly packed bunches (the “Pinot” in the name refers to the pinecone shape of the bunches). These tight bunches tend to be somewhat more susceptible to disease. Being thin-skinned, the grape is also at great risk from extremes in temperature. Fortunately, as it ripens early, it can be grown in cooler regions than heartier grapes (like Cabernet Sauvignon).

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Color: For red wines, color comes from the skins (it is not naturally present in the juice) in a process called “extraction.” Grapes go through a machine called a “crusher-destemmer,” and rather than being juiced as with white wine, the pulpy mass is then fermented in giant vats. Note that the skins will naturally float to the top, forming a “cap,” requiring some kind of system to circulate the fermenting juice (whether a “punch-down,” a “pump-over,” or some sort of a mixer).

Sometime after fermentation has completed, the “free run” is drained off. The remaining “pomace” is then pressed to extract all the remaining liquid. The free liquid is generally light in flavor and color than the pressed liquid, and so will often be aged separately, being blended only at the end to fine-tune before bottling.

Pinot Noir is thin-skinned with less color (anthocyanin) in the skins, it tends to extract less color, and thus is paler than most red wines. Being lighter in flavor, some winemakers will even leave the stems in for fermentation to impart more “tannins.”

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Tannins: Tannins are much more present in red wine than white wine, partly because they come from the skins during extraction (as well as seeds and stems, if present), and the oak barrels during aging. Tannins are traditionally used to turn hides into leather (“tanning”), hence the name. This is why bitter red wines often make your tongue feel dry and leathery. The “resolving” of tannins is a prime reason why many red wines get better with age.

Pinor Noir is notably low in tannins, and so some winemakers will leave the stems in for fermentation.

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Note: Australian

Flavors in Pinot Noir: As a lighter, more delicate wine, flavors tend toward the redder fruits such as cherry, strawberry, and raspberry. Less prominent notes might include vegetal (beets, green tomatoes, olives) or earthy (truffles, barnyard) flavors. Pinot does not typically display the darker fruit (plum) or spicier notes (cigar box) of other red wines. As a result of its lighter flavors, it tends to pair well with pork and fowl, rather than beef.

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Burgundy: Pinot Noir originates from Burgundy, a region in the east of France, between Champagne to the north, and Beaujolais to the south. Burgundy is divided into four major sub-regions (from north to south, and highest to lowest quality): Cote de Nuits, Cote de Beaune, Cote Chalonnaise, and Maconnais.

However, Burgundies will generally be labeled by their village, of which there are too many to list. There are about 600 “Premier Cru” vineyards across Burgundy, and only 32 “Grand Crus,” which will be more expensive, and generally superior to, the villages. The Premier and Grand Crus are designated by the French government based on the reputation of past production.

The Grand Cru red Burgundies are some of the most expensive and sought-after wines in the world, costing nearly $1000 a bottle in good years.

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Thanks again to Kyle for these notes.


01 2015

Beer Church Follow Up

Final updates:

On Tuesday 1/20/15, Justin helped me keg the beer. The specific gravity was 1.034 at this point, making for an ABV of 8.4%. We tasted the beer and decided not to add any black cherry extract, since the cherry flavor/smell seemed strong enough. It still has a strong chocolate porter taste. The keg was moved into the fridge. On Saturday 1/24/15, Agocs and Justin went to get more CO2 since we were out, and the beer was finally put on tap. Enjoy!

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On Tuesday 1/13/15, Ryan helped me rack the beer into a 5 gallon carboy for a second fermentation. We also added the sweet cherry puree, about 16 oz of it. The specific gravity reading was 1.036, and the beer tasted very chocolate-y.

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This past Sunday we started a brew for an Imperial Valentine Porter. We just checked on it tonight before the member meeting and it looks like the yeast has started fermenting.

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At the beginning of Beer Church on Sunday, we spent a while tasting the delicious beers that everyone brought. Selections included 2 coffee beers, a Superbier, a What the Pho porter, a stout, and a blueberry beer.

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After taking our time to enjoy the beer selection, we headed to Brew & Grow to obtain the ingredients listed on this page:


  • 1 lb uk crystal malt (60L) (UK Paul’s Medium Crystal Malt 60L)
  • 8oz UK brown malt (UK TF & S Brown Malt)
  • 8oz UK chocolate malt (UK Paul’s Chocolate Malt #315)
  • 8lbs any UK brand dark malt extract (not sure if solid or syrup)


  • 1 pack Wyeast 1187 or White Labs WLP001 or Fermentis S-04

Malt Extract:

  • 8 lbs any brand UK dark


  • 4 to 6 AAUs medium-alpha acid (such as Northern Brewer)

Later Additions:

  • 1 lb lactose
  • 1 lb Demerara sugar (we used Raw Cane Sugar from Jewel)
  • 8 oz high quality unsweetened cocoa powder (we used Nestle)
  • 1 tsp Irish moss
  • 1 tsp yeast nutrient
  • 16 US fl oz black cherry concentrate (we used sweet cherry puree)
  • 4 fl oz cherry flavoring or extract (to taste at bottling)

(Disclaimer: My memory is imperfect and since this was my first time as brewmaster, I will probably get some of these steps wrong due to unfamiliarity. Consult the wiki page for more information.)
After cleaning some equipment and some mishaps with the propane regulator, the first step after getting water to the correct temperature in between 160 and 170 degrees Fahrenheit, was to steep the grains. The grains steeped for half an hour. They smelled burnt afterwards, since they were dark grains.

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Three gallons of water were added to the mash for the next step, the boil (The goal was to end up with 5 gallons of wort). The wort was brought to a boil and 1 oz of hops was added. All of the malt extract was added as well. There was constant stirring for the duration of the boil, but a boilover still occurred once when we failed to turn down the heat quickly enough. After half an hour, another 1 oz of hops was added. The wort smelled like tea at this point. After another half an hour, we turned off the heat and added the lactose, sugar, cocoa powder, irish moss and yeast nutrient and stirred until they were dissolved. After the cocoa powder was dissolved, the wort turned a chocolate-brown color and smelled deliciously of chocolate.

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In the meantime, the other equipment we needed was sanitized using StarSan. The copper cooling coil was rinsed and placed into the boiling kettle. After another 15 minutes of rolling boil, the heat was turned off and we started pumping cold water through the cooling coil until the wort reached a temperature of about 75 degrees Fahrenheit.

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After some more sanitizing, the wort was pumped into a 6-gallon glass carboy. The yeast, after being activated, was poured into the carboy, and a cork with trap attached were inserted into the top of the carboy. The cork was sealed with wire and the carboy was placed into the fermenting area, for a first fermentation of an estimated 7-12 days. Before corking, we did take a sample for the hydrometer and obtained a specific gravity reading of 1.098, very close to the book’s suggested 1.084. The total brew time was about 6 hours (including trip to Brew & Grow).

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And after cleanup, we all got to taste the brew!



Thanks to everyone for coming! Thanks to Eric and Justin for helping me out so much. Feel free to join us for the second fermentation and the bottling, to be announced.


01 2015