Posts Tagged ‘TOOOL’

Lockpicking with TOOOL – ATM Edition.

When I found an ATM in the trash near my office, I knew just what had to be done. It had to come to the hackerspace.

IMAG0183After some help from a friend with a truck, we got the ATM delivered to the space just in time for Lockpicking night with TOOOL – The Open Organization of Lockpickers. (Fig. 1. — pictures after the break)  We set to work on the two (surprisingly basic) pin tumbler locks on the front of the panel, and sprung them in no time. (Fig. 2)  Under the the bottom panel we were greeted with a welcoming safe-door style combination dial. (Fig. 3)  Under the top panel are a power supply, circuit boards for the display, the card reader, the pin entry pad and the LCD buttons, and the receipt printer. (Fig. 4)  Sadly, the main computer had been removed before the unit was thrown out.

That being said, TOOOL is not a computer oriented group, so we were plenty pleased with the new challenge presented to us by the combination lock.  Steve decided to give it a go first, boldly citing his experience in safe cracking school. (Fig. 5)  Dave, not being the patient type, and not being entertained by Steve just poking at his phone, decided to take a more destructive route to enter the ATM with a plasma cutter (Fig. 6) and was rewarded with a large empty space and yet another steel plate.  We will be revisiting opening the door next time, and continuing to seek inspiration for awesome ATM projects.  Let us know what you’d like to see an ATM turned into!

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04

06 2015

Lock Picking and SEM

spoolpinBack in October, Pumping Station: One hosted an event called Locktoberfest, an annual event run by the Chicago chapter of TOOOL (The Open Organisation Of Lockpickers.) It features, well, lockpicking, beer, and brats. (The beer is necessary to relax one’s hands. Really. I mean it.) A number of nationally known people came out to Chicago for this, including Deviant Ollam and Babak Javadi.

Lock picking involves manipulating small components. Small metal components, which are conductive, and would image well in a scanning electron microscope. And it just so happens that we’re probably the only hackerspace with a working SEM.

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15

12 2013